The Conversation is Evolving

There’s so much discussion about comment fragmentation here , here, and here (ironically there are plenty of comments on each of the original posts). But what’s the big fuss?

I think instead of getting anxious, bloggers need to adapt. Yes, the conversations are becoming fragmented. The question is,


What are you (the blogger) going to do about it?

We can all complain about not getting the pageviews but is that going to change reader behaviour? Probably not. I doubt all the blog posts in the world chastising FriendFeed and Shyfter is going to change anything. Tony Hung makes a good argument that Shyfter crosses the line but he does accept that user comments do not belong to him.

The fact is reader behaviour is changing: we want everything now and if you can’t give it to us how and when we want it, we’ll get it from somewhere that can. I think it’s time to embrace the evolution of the conversation before too many get left in the dark ages.

UPDATE: Just read a post by Rick Mahn, and he seems to agree, players need to adapt the the playing field.

Do you plan on adapting to these new changes in the conversation? Or do you think there’s a way out of this?

  • Actually, I have no problem with comments not belonging to me.

    In fact, if you read my post carefully (which — don’t worry — not many people did) I called bloggers that don’t understand this fact (comments not being on-blog) as being both hypocritical and stupid, as this element of non-control is a vital part of understanding what social media is.

    The problem is that Scoble tried to compare two different things: Comments being hosted off-blog (Louis Gray) and Sites which are rehosting all of bloggers content (Me) and a great deal of people ewre getting the two confused (including Scoble).

    Cheers
    tony.

    Tony Hung’s last blog post..I Love Techmeme But … (Part II)

  • Tony, thanks for stopping by.

    I apologize that I gave the impression that you have a problem with comments not belonging to you. I wanted to acknowledge that you actually recognized the fact that bloggers have no rights on reader comments.

    I’m neutral on Shyfter as I haven’t used it yet and am not entirely clear on its implications.

  • Shey, you’re right on the money – and explained it much better than I did. The fact is reader habits are changing, we do not have any ownership over where they comment, and the trend is to content aggregation.

    Either we adapt & grow, or we complain, become discouraged, and ultimately quit. I’ll grow, thank you!

    Regards,
    Rick

    Rick Mahn’s last blog post..Thoughts on Comment Fragmentation

  • I recently posted about all of the Tony and Louis conversation as well. My thinking is that if we had something like trackbacks everywhere, then the conversations do not get lost. For example, Louis shared my post on friendfeed, but I had no clue. One of his “friends” posted a comment there, but also posted a link on my blog to the friendfeed page. I found several comments and was able to participate. That is a good thing. If there is no notification or linking, then participating in the conversation becomes immensely difficult.

    Rob Diana’s last blog post..Comment Where You Want, Just Let Me Know About It

  • Hi Rob,

    I really like your idea of comment trackbacks, that sounds excellent.

    @Rick Thanks!

  • Actually, I have no problem with comments not belonging to me.

    In fact, if you read my post carefully (which — don’t worry — not many people did) I called bloggers that don’t understand this fact (comments not being on-blog) as being both hypocritical and stupid, as this element of non-control is a vital part of understanding what social media is.

    The problem is that Scoble tried to compare two different things: Comments being hosted off-blog (Louis Gray) and Sites which are rehosting all of bloggers content (Me) and a great deal of people ewre getting the two confused (including Scoble).

    Cheers
    tony.

    Tony Hung’s last blog post..I Love Techmeme But … (Part II)

  • Tony, thanks for stopping by.

    I apologize that I gave the impression that you have a problem with comments not belonging to you. I wanted to acknowledge that you actually recognized the fact that bloggers have no rights on reader comments.

    I’m neutral on Shyfter as I haven’t used it yet and am not entirely clear on its implications.

  • Shey, you’re right on the money – and explained it much better than I did. The fact is reader habits are changing, we do not have any ownership over where they comment, and the trend is to content aggregation.

    Either we adapt & grow, or we complain, become discouraged, and ultimately quit. I’ll grow, thank you!

    Regards,
    Rick

    Rick Mahn’s last blog post..Thoughts on Comment Fragmentation

  • I recently posted about all of the Tony and Louis conversation as well. My thinking is that if we had something like trackbacks everywhere, then the conversations do not get lost. For example, Louis shared my post on friendfeed, but I had no clue. One of his “friends” posted a comment there, but also posted a link on my blog to the friendfeed page. I found several comments and was able to participate. That is a good thing. If there is no notification or linking, then participating in the conversation becomes immensely difficult.

    Rob Diana’s last blog post..Comment Where You Want, Just Let Me Know About It

  • Hi Rob,

    I really like your idea of comment trackbacks, that sounds excellent.

    @Rick Thanks!

  • I definitely plan to adapt. At the same time, I’m seeing a nice incoming flow of tools that are slowly helping us to adapt to the situation. For example, with Friendfeed, there’s a WordPress plugin by Glenn Slaven that you can place right above your comments so that you can view any comments or “likes” from Friendfeed users, directly on your blog.

    Social RSS feed reader Fav.or.it, has also boasted of its technology to post comments made within it’s community back to the original content. You also have social commenting system Disqus that allows you to view comments not only on your site, but also within the Disqus homepage itself, where you have your own community.

    It’s a rather interesting change that’s happening and one that I was initially upset over. Now, I’m more than ready to see how it all plays out.

    Corvida’s last blog post..Facebook Is No Threat To Friendfeed

  • I find that some people are getting confused over the comment fragmentation issue in that they confuse ownership with traceability.

    I’m using the WP FriendFeed plugin Corvida mentions and it works nicely. I’ve also tested the way fav.or.it forwards over comments made within its environment. They both make a big difference.

    In my view, the key is not forcing your readership to your homepage but to be able to keep track of them and aggregate the comments in one place in order to facilitate the flow of conversation.

    Colin Walker’s last blog post..Social bookmarking for social media.

  • Hey Corvida and Colin,

    That sounds like a really cool FriendFeed plugin, I’ll need to try that out.

    I’ve been contemplating Disqus, heard both good and bad about it, especially the lack of ability for commentors to add code. Still mulling it over.

    Thanks for coming by 🙂

  • I definitely plan to adapt. At the same time, I’m seeing a nice incoming flow of tools that are slowly helping us to adapt to the situation. For example, with Friendfeed, there’s a WordPress plugin by Glenn Slaven that you can place right above your comments so that you can view any comments or “likes” from Friendfeed users, directly on your blog.

    Social RSS feed reader Fav.or.it, has also boasted of its technology to post comments made within it’s community back to the original content. You also have social commenting system Disqus that allows you to view comments not only on your site, but also within the Disqus homepage itself, where you have your own community.

    It’s a rather interesting change that’s happening and one that I was initially upset over. Now, I’m more than ready to see how it all plays out.

    Corvida’s last blog post..Facebook Is No Threat To Friendfeed

  • I find that some people are getting confused over the comment fragmentation issue in that they confuse ownership with traceability.

    I’m using the WP FriendFeed plugin Corvida mentions and it works nicely. I’ve also tested the way fav.or.it forwards over comments made within its environment. They both make a big difference.

    In my view, the key is not forcing your readership to your homepage but to be able to keep track of them and aggregate the comments in one place in order to facilitate the flow of conversation.

    Colin Walker’s last blog post..Social bookmarking for social media.

  • Hey Corvida and Colin,

    That sounds like a really cool FriendFeed plugin, I’ll need to try that out.

    I’ve been contemplating Disqus, heard both good and bad about it, especially the lack of ability for commentors to add code. Still mulling it over.

    Thanks for coming by 🙂

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